East Metro Youth Services
2017 – 2018 Impact Report

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, concerned citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”
– Margaret Mead

Letter from the Board Chair & CEO

Mary Jarrell

Chairperson

Debra Shime

Chief Executive Officer

Debra Shime

Chief Executive Officer

Mary Jarrell

Chairperson

Welcome to East Metro Youth Services’ (EMYS) Annual Impact Report for 2017/2018!

The past year at EMYS has been another momentous one, marked by many transitional and transformative changes, including how we share the impact of our work with you – our clients, members, partners, and the Toronto community. Using a more visual, interactive, online approach, you will be able to easily find what matters to you most. We hope you enjoy the new look.

The change in our Annual Report design isn’t the only big change we want to highlight. This past year EMYS said goodbye to Executive Director Claire Fainer as she retired after 30 years of service. We thank her for all her years of hard work, dedication and passion for the sector. We welcomed Deb Shime as the new Chief Executive Officer in December. Prior to that, she was the Senior Vice President of Community Impact at United Way Greater Toronto. To ensure a successful transition, Deb engaged with many partners and stakeholders including Toronto’s Core Service Providers, Provincial Youth Outreach Worker affiliated agencies, the City of Toronto, Government of Ontario, and all of East Metro’s staff and Board of Directors.

We finalized our new governance model as part of our lead agency work. We worked collaboratively with Toronto’s Core Service Providers to determine the skills for our new board that not only represent East Metro, but also help the sector with its ongoing transformation within the city.

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We reviewed and updated our 2016-2021 Strategic Plan and priorities to better reflect the context of the environment we work within. The four priorities included: build performance management capacity to better evaluate outcomes; develop infrastructure for information management and shared services; examine strategic alignment to optimize impact; and develop and support change management practices and enhance communications.

We are so proud to share that this year our Gender-Based Violence Program was awarded funding through the Ministry of Community and Social Services, Provincial Strategy to End Human Trafficking- Community Supports Fund. This funding has been instrumental in the continuation and expansion of our capacity to support survivors of domestic human trafficking. The Gender-Based Violence program is appreciative of the support from the Ministry and look forward to the continued partnership.

Lastly, EMYS became unionized and we welcome our partners from United Food and Commercial Workers 175. We are looking forward to a productive partnership.

Even though EMYS is continually growing, evolving, and fine-tuning, our vision remains the same: we will do “Whatever It Takes” to go above and beyond to deliver high quality of service to youth and families. We will always work towards:

  • Putting people first
  • Valuing diversity
  • Being culturally competent
  • Upholding professional excellence
  • Leading collaboratively
  • Enable ongoing learning and
  • Encourage innovation.

As we move forward into the year ahead, we again acknowledge there is more change ahead with more work to be done. A big thank you to everyone who has supported East Metro Youth Services this year, including our staff, board of directors, donors, partners, and funders (the Government of Ontario, United Way of Greater Toronto, and City of Toronto). Your efforts have helped over 4,500 children and youth reach their optimal mental health and build a better mental health system for Toronto’s infants, children, youth and families.

Deb Shime CEO
Mary Jarrell Chairperson

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Impact

1489 Total Clients
Gender Based Violence

Gender-Based Violence (GBV) is an expanding program at East Metro Youth Services (EMYS) that supports survivors of domestic human trafficking and internet exploitation ages 12 to 29. The GBV program provides direct, trauma-informed, support and services for survivors, including: trauma therapy, community outreach, peer support and groups.

Visit website

3.4

3.4%

51 clients served

what’s up walk-in® Clinic

The what’s up walk-in clinic is Toronto’s only free, six day a week mental health walk-in counselling service for children, youth, young adults, and families. Therapists offer single session/Strengths-Based therapeutic interventions. The clinic helps with issues such as depression, anxiety, self-harm, suicidal ideation, sexual identity matters, bullying, behavioural concerns, addictions, and anything else that might be on one’s mind. The clinic is barrier free, and accessible. The walk-in clinic is a city-wide effort and is made up of six partnering agencies: East Metro Youth Services, The Etobicoke Children Centre, Griffin Centre, Skylark Children, Youth, and Families, Yorktown, and YouthLink.

Visit website
71.4

71.4%

1064 clients served

Whatever It Takes

The Whatever it Takes (WIT) program is a collaboration between East Metro Youth Services and The Griffin Centre. WIT helps the service system respond to the needs of children and youth aged 0 to 18 years, with complex clinical profiles and complicated service needs that require cross sector service provision.

3.3

3.3%

49 clients served

Priority Access for Schools

The Priority Access for Schools (PAS) program provides individual and family counselling and case management support to youth who are referred from the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) and Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB).

Visit website
7.3

7.3%

109 clients served

Community Counselling

The goal of Community Counselling is to provide family-focused, time-limited service (up to six months), that strengthens the ability of children and youth to function effectively in their home, school and/or community as well as address their mental health issues.

5.4

5.4%

80 clients served

Residential Treatement

East Metro Youth Services operates one co-ed residential treatment program located in Scarborough. Our residential treatment program accommodates adolescents between the ages of 12 to 18, who are coping with an array of psychiatric, emotional, and/or behavioural challenges that interfere with their ability to function.

Visit website
0.7

0.7%

10 clients served

Priority Access Child Welfare

Priority Access for Child Welfare (PACW) are designed to help children and youth that are experiencing or at-risk of experiencing: breakdown in relationships at home that could lead to child welfare placement; severe difficulties at school that could lead to loss of school placement; significant mental health and/or addiction issues and transition difficulties from a child welfare, young offender and/or psychiatric mental health system. The goals of the program are to reduce the severity of the difficulties and reduce the risk for out-of-home placement.

Visit website
4.5

4.5%

68 clients served

Day Treatment

The Day Treatment School Program provides an education setting combined with therapy that enables adolescents to deal with a variety of problems and helps them to return to the school system or enter the work force. Youth considered for Day Treatment are between the ages of 12 to 18 and are not able to maintain themselves successfully in a community school.

Visit website
4

4%

58 clients served

Gender Based Violence

Gender-Based Violence (GBV) is an expanding program at East Metro Youth Services (EMYS) that supports survivors of domestic human trafficking and internet exploitation ages 12 to 29. The GBV program provides direct, trauma-informed, support and services for survivors, including: trauma therapy, community outreach, peer support and groups.

Visit website
what’s up walk-in® Clinic

The what’s up walk-in clinic is Toronto’s only free, six day a week mental health walk-in counselling service for children, youth, young adults, and families. Therapists offer single session/Strengths-Based therapeutic interventions. The clinic helps with issues such as depression, anxiety, self-harm, suicidal ideation, sexual identity matters, bullying, behavioural concerns, addictions, and anything else that might be on one’s mind. The clinic is barrier free, and accessible. The walk-in clinic is a city-wide effort and is made up of six partnering agencies: East Metro Youth Services, The Etobicoke Children Centre, Griffin Centre, Skylark Children, Youth, and Families, Yorktown, and YouthLink.

Visit website
Whatever It Takes

The Whatever it Takes (WIT) program is a collaboration between East Metro Youth Services and The Griffin Centre. WIT helps the service system respond to the needs of children and youth aged 0 to 18 years, with complex clinical profiles and complicated service needs that require cross sector service provision.

3.4

3.4%

51 clients served

71.46

71.4%

1064 clients served

3.3

3.3%

49 clients served

Priority Access for Schools

The Priority Access for Schools (PAS) program provides individual and family counselling and case management support to youth who are referred from the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) and Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB).

Visit website
Community Counselling

The goal of Community Counselling is to provide family-focused, time-limited service (up to six months), that strengthens the ability of children and youth to function effectively in their home, school and/or community as well as address their mental health issues.

7.3

7.3%

109 clients served

5.37

5.4%

80 clients served

Residential Treatement

East Metro Youth Services operates one co-ed residential treatment program located in Scarborough. Our residential treatment program accommodates adolescents between the ages of 12 to 18, who are coping with an array of psychiatric, emotional, and/or behavioural challenges that interfere with their ability to function.

Visit website
Priority Access Child Welfare

Priority Access for Child Welfare (PACW) are designed to help children and youth that are experiencing or at-risk of experiencing: breakdown in relationships at home that could lead to child welfare placement; severe difficulties at school that could lead to loss of school placement; significant mental health and/or addiction issues and transition difficulties from a child welfare, young offender and/or psychiatric mental health system. The goals of the program are to reduce the severity of the difficulties and reduce the risk for out-of-home placement.

Visit website
Day Treatment

The Day Treatment School Program provides an education setting combined with therapy that enables adolescents to deal with a variety of problems and helps them to return to the school system or enter the work force. Youth considered for Day Treatment are between the ages of 12 to 18 and are not able to maintain themselves successfully in a community school.

Visit website
.67

0.7%

10 clients served

4.57

4.5%

68 clients served

3.9

4%

58 clients served

3274 Total Clients
Youth in Transition

The Youth in Transition Program supports youth transitioning from the child welfare sector into adulthood. To be eligible, youth must be between 16 to 24 years old and a crown ward. Some resources and supports may include, housing and or educational supports, employment and services training, life skills (e.g. financial management, household management), legal services and health and mental health services.

Visit website

1.8

1.8%

59 clients served

Youth Outreach Worker Program

The Youth Outreach Worker Program is an initiative for marginalized youth 12 to 24 years old and their families in East Toronto. It is designed to help empower and provide them with individualized programming to meet their unique needs and circumstances. Youth Outreach Workers (YOWs) also work with other community resources to coordinate youth activities and services.

Visit website

*This number is representative of the YOW East Quadrant in Toronto.

66.3

66.3%

2170* clients served

The Zone Youth Space

In partnership with Toronto Parks, Forestry and Recreation, East Metro Youth Services (EMYS) offers Scarborough youth an Enhanced Youth Space.  The Youth Space is a safe place where youth can come to create, connect, learn and inspire.

Visit website
18.1

18.1%

592 clients served

Studio 2 Multimedia Program

Studio 2 supports youth in developing multimedia skills, as well as social skills, with an emphasis on media literacy, employability skills and mental health.  Studio 2 utilizes various forms of industry standard digital media software and hardware, to engage youth to design a variety of media projects.

Visit website
1.92

1.92%

63 clients served

Newcomer Program

The Newcomer Youth Program is offered to youth ages 12 to 21 who are permanent residents or conventional refugees. The program is funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).  The program provides free programs every month that include volunteer opportunities, sports events, workshops and trips around Toronto.

Visit website
4.7

4.7%

155 clients served

Strengthening Families Program

Our House Your House

Our House Your House is a family skills training program modeled on the Strengthening Families program (SFP), an evidence-based clinical intervention that was found highly effective in improving family relations and reducing risk factors in children and youth.

Visit website
1.89

1.89%

62 clients served

East QREW

East QREW is a Scarborough-based social, drop-in group for LGBTQ2SA+ youth that meets once a week to bring youth together in a safe and supportive environment. It is a place where they can connect to others who have like experiences and feel more supported in their community, engage in discussions, and receive emotional support from staff and peers. It offers activities and workshops that focus on improving mental health through yoga, meditation and stress reduction.

Visit website
1.19

1.19%

39 clients served

RISE

The Respect in Schools Everywhere (RISE) Program is an intensive youth-led school-based violence prevention and mentorship program for grades 7 to 12.  Youth participants are responsible for developing and facilitating workshops focused on bullying, mental health and stigma and conflict resolution.  RISE has developed a program model for schools based on evidence-based practices and current research.

Visit website
1.5

1.5%

49 clients served

Developmental Services

Galloway After School Program

The Galloway After School Program is a socialization, life skills, and activity group for adolescents and young adults in East Toronto who have been diagnosed with Autism or a mild to moderate developmental challenge.

Visit website
2.6

2.6%

85 clients served

Youth in Transition

The Youth in Transition Program supports youth transitioning from the child welfare sector into adulthood. To be eligible, youth must be between 16 to 24 years old and a crown ward. Some resources and supports may include, housing and or educational supports, employment and services training, life skills (e.g. financial management, household management), legal services and health and mental health services.

Visit website
Youth Outreach Worker Program

The Youth Outreach Worker Program is an initiative for marginalized youth 12 to 24 years old and their families in East Toronto. It is designed to help empower and provide them with individualized programming to meet their unique needs and circumstances. Youth Outreach Workers (YOWs) also work with other community resources to coordinate youth activities and services.

Visit website

*This number is representative of the YOW East Quadrant in Toronto.

The Zone Youth Space

In partnership with Toronto Parks, Forestry and Recreation, East Metro Youth Services (EMYS) offers Scarborough youth an Enhanced Youth Space.  The Youth Space is a safe place where youth can come to create, connect, learn and inspire.

Visit website
1.8

1.8%

59 clients served

66.28

66.3%

2170* clients served

18.08

18.1%

592 clients served

Studio 2 Multimedia Program

Studio 2 supports youth in developing multimedia skills, as well as social skills, with an emphasis on media literacy, employability skills and mental health.  Studio 2 utilizes various forms of industry standard digital media software and hardware, to engage youth to design a variety of media projects.

Visit website
Newcomer Program

The Newcomer Youth Program is offered to youth ages 12 to 21 who are permanent residents or conventional refugees. The program is funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).  The program provides free programs every month that include volunteer opportunities, sports events, workshops and trips around Toronto.

Visit website
Strengthening Families Program

Our House Your House

Our House Your House is a family skills training program modeled on the Strengthening Families program (SFP), an evidence-based clinical intervention that was found highly effective in improving family relations and reducing risk factors in children and youth.

Visit website
1.92

1.92%

63 clients served

4.73

4.7%

155 clients served

1.89

1.89%

62 clients served

East QREW

East QREW is a Scarborough-based social, drop-in group for LGBTQ2SA+ youth that meets once a week to bring youth together in a safe and supportive environment. It is a place where they can connect to others who have like experiences and feel more supported in their community, engage in discussions, and receive emotional support from staff and peers. It offers activities and workshops that focus on improving mental health through yoga, meditation and stress reduction.

Visit website
RISE

The Respect in Schools Everywhere (RISE) Program is an intensive youth-led school-based violence prevention and mentorship program for grades 7 to 12.  Youth participants are responsible for developing and facilitating workshops focused on bullying, mental health and stigma and conflict resolution.  RISE has developed a program model for schools based on evidence-based practices and current research.

Visit website
Developmental Services

Galloway After School Program

The Galloway After School Program is a socialization, life skills, and activity group for adolescents and young adults in East Toronto who have been diagnosed with Autism or a mild to moderate developmental challenge.

Visit website
1.19

1.19%

39 clients served

1.5

1.5%

49 clients served

2.6

2.6%

85 clients served

Under the former Ministry of Children and Youth Services Moving on Mental Health (MOMH) action plan, East Metro Youth Services was named Lead Agency for Toronto.

As a lead agency, we are tasked with leading and implementing system-wide changes to improve access, experience and mental health outcomes for infants, children, youth and families. EMYS is working in collaboration with other health, education, social services and mental health service agencies and through meaningful youth and family engagement. EMYS also participates in province-wide lead agency discussions, sharing lessons and insights, and informing a province-wide approach.

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Our Core Service Providers:

Adventure Place, Aisling Discoveries Child & Family Centre, Arrabon House Inc., BOOST for Kids, Breakaway Addiction Services, CAFCAN Social Services, Central Toronto Youth Services, Centre francophone de Toronto, Children’s Aid Society of Toronto, Earlscourt-Créche Child Development Institute, The Etobicoke Children’s Centre, George Hull Centre for Children & Families, Griffin Centre Mental Health Services, Humewood House Association, Jessie’s – The June Callwood Centre for Young Women, Jewish Family & Child Service, Kennedy House Youth Services, LOFT Community Services, The Massey Centre for Women, North York General Hospital, Rosalie Hall, Sancta Maria House, Scarborough and Rouge Hospital, SickKids Centre for Community Mental Health, Skylark Children, Youth & Families, Turning Point Youth Services, Yorktown Family Services, Youthdale Treatment Centres, YouthLink.

30 

Core Service Providers

School Boards

Working Groups

613 

Meetings/calls with partners & stakeholders

Family members we engage with

63 

Youth we engage with

Children we engage with

30

Core Service Providers

4

School Boards

6

Working Groups

613

Meetings/calls with partners & stakeholders

6

Family members we engage with

63

Youth we engage with

6

Children we engage with

Impact Stories

Meeting our young people and families where they are

East Metro Youth Services exists so that young people and their families have the strongest possible chance and outcomes in improving their mental health.

We ensure the interests of infants, children, youth and families are central in all our decisions and work to support their unique needs, circumstances, and strengths. We want to thank each and every person who walked through our doors this year in search of mental health supports and trusted us with their care. Below are just a few client success stories that show just how important the work we do is and how impactful our programs can be.

Partnership Stories

Working Together To Create A Better System For Our Young People And Families

We know that to have real impact, you need the power of partnerships. East Metro has a long history of partnering with other organizations, foundations and people to ensure our young people, families and communities get the best access to services and supports they need.

We are honoured and humbled by our partners and continue to be encouraged by the opportunities afforded when we connect with others who share our passion. Below are just a few examples of partners we want to highlight over the past year!

DONORS, FUNDERS, GOVERNMENT SUPPORTERS

Thank you to our individual and corporate donors, funders and sponsors for your generosity and support!

*** This list reflects donations received between April 1 2017 to March 31, 2018. Every effort has been made to ensure names are accurately acknowledged. Please contact us at 416-438-3697 ext. 12225 to report any errors and/or omissions so we can update our records.

Alessia Kalish

Alicia Hayes

Arpi Mar

Brian Ashton

CAMH

Centre of Excellence

Chris Jackson

City of Toronto

Claire J. Fainer and Brian O’hara

Connar Walik

Crystal McLaughlin

Danielle Gutstein

Denise Lawee

Diane Porteous

Dr. Laski

ECHO Foundation

Elaine Goldberg

Elisbeth Shokking

Elizabeth Jarrell

Emily Dixon

Eric Sacks

Erica Fisico

George Chiu

Government of Canada

Grace Almirante

Hats On For Awareness

Help For Children

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

J.W. McConnell Family Foundation

Jamie Habert

Jason Pooley

Jennifer Woodill

JoAnne Korten, ED

Judy Marshall

Julie Fraser

Kenneth Burke

Kevin Leonard

Laura Banks

Lauren van den Berg

Leah Kalish

Maria Cuzzolino-Lam

Maria Pamela Parian

Mary Jarrell

Michael Glina

Michel Kalish

Michelle Lemmon

Ministry of Children and Youth Services

Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services

Ministry of Community Social Services

Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport

Mireille Habert

Mr. and Mrs. Ruben Lofe

Mr. Michael Jarrell

Nafis Khan

Nitrogen and Gil Castro

Paniz Boloourchi

Patricia Jung

Peter Sit

Public Safety Canada

RBC Foundation

Renelie Araenta

Robin Alter

Rosemary Bonnell

Rouge Valley Health System

Sangjoon Park

Second Harvest

Shane Spring

Sharon Appleby

Mary Palatsidis

Sorel & Brian Park

Stanley Risen

United Way of Greater Toronto

Victoria Prince

Alessia Kalish

Alicia Hayes

Arpi Mar

Brian Ashton

CAMH

Centre of Excellence

Chris Jackson

City of Toronto

Claire J. Fainer and Brian O’hara

Connar Walik

Crystal McLaughlin

Danielle Gutstein

Denise Lawee

Diane Porteous

Dr. Laski

ECHO Foundation

Elaine Goldberg

Elisbeth Shokking

Elizabeth Jarrell

Emily Dixon

Eric Sacks

Erica Fisico

George Chiu

Government of Canada

Grace Almirante

Hats On For Awareness

Help For Children

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

J.W. McConnell Family Foundation

Jamie Habert

Jason Pooley

Jennifer Woodill

JoAnne Korten, ED

Judy Marshall

Julie Fraser

Kenneth Burke

Kevin Leonard

Laura Banks

Lauren van den Berg

Leah Kalish

Maria Cuzzolino-Lam

Maria Pamela Parian

Mary Jarrell

Michael Glina

Michel Kalish

Michelle Lemmon

Ministry of Children and Youth Services

Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services

Ministry of Community Social Services

Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport

Mireille Habert

Mr. and Mrs. Ruben Lofe

Mr. Michael Jarrell

Nafis Khan

Nitrogen and Gil Castro

Paniz Boloourchi

Patricia Jung

Peter Sit

Public Safety Canada

RBC Foundation

Renelie Araenta

Robin Alter

Rosemary Bonnell

Rouge Valley Health System

Sangjoon Park

Second Harvest

Shane Spring

Sharon Appleby

Mary Palatsidis

Sorel & Brian Park

Stanley Risen

United Way of Greater Toronto

Victoria Prince

THE YEAR AHEAD: 2018/2019

Mental health services for infants, children, youth and families has never been in more demand. More and more young people and their families are coming forward demanding better, more accessible mental health services that are timely, efficient and equitable.

In 2018-2019, we will continue and grow projects that were started successfully over the past year, such as our Centralized Point of Access, now known as Mental Health T.O.: Access for Infants, Children, Youth & Families. In collaboration with Toronto’s Core Service Providers, we’ve created a free referral phone service to help connect infants, children, youth, and families to mental health and addiction services in the community. The goal is to help those in need find and get mental health help as efficiently and quickly as possible.

We are also working diligently with our Youth Outreach Program agencies, City of Toronto and Government of Ontario, to address the recent increase in gun-related violence in Toronto and the surrounding areas. Collaboratively, we are working together to look at strategies to curb the escalation and engage directly with communities where youth are considered most at risk for being victims or perpetrators.

To ensure the continued success of our system-transformation, we are engaging in a three-year plan framework that will guide our work into 2021. Working with Toronto’s Core Service Providers and key sector stakeholders, we have identified four priority areas, which we will operationalize through the coming year. They include: access, sustainability, service alignment and data management.

As we work through the above, will also be welcoming a new relationship with Premier Ford and the Progressive Conservative Government. We are committed to building strong relationships with this government to ensure children and youth mental health remains a priority in Ontario.

Lastly, we are saying goodbye to a few EMYS senior leadership staff, including Roberta Bustard, Director of Lead Agency, Jerry Calkowski, Senior Director of Corporate Services and Finances, and Alex Alexander, Director of Performance and Data Management and Alignment, in addition to Janice Sellon who retired after 30 years of service. We are incredibly grateful for their contributions and dedication to EMYS.

We have hired David Willis as Director of Strategy and Systems Management and Junie B. Facey as Director of Community Engagement and Development Services.

Sadly, we are also saying good bye to long-standing board members Brian Ashton, Charlene Di Danieli, Jameel Boothe, and Gareh Murray Johnson.   We thank them for their contributions and years of service. We will be introducing seven new board members for the 2018/2019 fiscal year.

We hope you will continue to join us along our journey and help us reach our goals as we seek to increase our impact not only within EMYS and for our clients, but across Toronto with our partners and communities.

Three-year plan

Access
Sustainability
Service alignment
Data management

THE FACES BEHIND EMYS

Board of Directors
Chairperson

Mary Jarrell

Past Chairperson

Judy Marshall

Secretary

Jameel Boothe

Treasurer

Peter Sit

Directors

Maria Cuzzolino-Lam

Brain Ashton

Charlene Di Danieli

Gareh Murray Johnson

Chief Executive Officer

Deb Shime